The Oscars 2014

Best Picture

Nominees: 12 Years a SlaveAmerican Hustle, Captain Phillips, Dallas Buyers ClubGravityHer, NebraskaPhilomenaThe Wolf of Wall Street 

Should Win: 12 Years a Slave
Will Win: 12 Years a Slave
Shoulda been a contender: Inside Llewyn Davis; The Act of Killing; The Great Beauty (La Grande Bellaza);
Blue Jasmine

This year’s is a relatively strong Best Picture list from the Academy (though I must admit to not having been able to catch all nine: I missed Philomena) and of the nominated nine it’s the two favourites for the award, Gravity and 12 Years a Slave, that stand out as exceptional. My choice, by a whisker, would be 12 Years a Slave, although Gravity would make a more than worthy winner. For vastly different reasons both films are exceptional examples of the craft and important too. Gravity is technically a real milestone for modern film and 12 Years a Slave addresses the United States’ history of slavery in a way unprecedented in cinema. The awards season has seen Gravity showered with numerous awards but the momentum in the Best Picture category is all with 12 Years a Slave and I think it’ll end up taking the Oscar home.
In terms of the films I’d like to have seen in the list of nominees there are at least four that I’d make a case for. Inside Llewyn Davis is the Coens at their very best and though its melancholic nature and complexity may have scuppered its chances, this funny, moving, fascinating film is comfortably among the best of the past 12 months. The documentary The Act of Killing will most likely walk home with the Best Documentary Feature award but it really ought to have taken a place on the Best Picture list too. I personally think it’s the best work of the last year, breathtaking in numerous ways and a piece of filmmaking that will live long in the memory. The Great Beauty is another film that will probably end up with an Oscar on Sunday being as it’s the favourite to bag the Best Foreign Film award for Italy but Paolo Sorrentino’s masterpiece is a glorious film that stands head and shoulders above most of the Academy’s nominees. Finally, Blue Jasmine is probably the most genuinely surprising omission seeing as it has nods for two acting awards as well as the script. Forget the unremarkable Midnight in Paris, this is Woody Allen’s true return to form and it’s both a surprise and a bit of a shame that it didn’t make the Academy’s list, particularly when they only nominated nine films of a possible ten.

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Best Director

Nominees: Alfonso Cuaron (Gravity); Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave); Alexander Payne (Nebraska); David O. Russell (American Hustle); Martin Scorsese (The Wolf of Wall Street)

Should Win: Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave) / Alfonso Cuaron (Gravity)
Will Win: Alfonso Cuaron (Gravity)
Should’ve been a contender: The Coen Brothers (Inside Llewyn Davis); Joseph Oppenheimer (The Act of Killing); Paolo Sorrentino (The Great Beauty)

Steve McQueen and Alfonso Cuaron are by a distance the best of the 5 nominees for the directing award. Personally, I’d not have included any of the other three: Scorsese and David O. Russell have done better work and, while it’s a fine debut, Alexander Payne’s direction of Nebraska isn’t particularly exceptional. In a not-very-interesting move my picks as shoulda-beens are three of the directors of films I felt ought to have got a nod for Best Picture. Of the three I think Joseph Oppenheimer is particularly unfortunate to have missed out as his documentary is an incredible feat of directing in extraordinary circumstances.
I think Alfonso Cuaron will win so as to share the love between the two front-running films but for my personal pick I can’t separate Cuaron and McQueen. Both deserve recognition for two very different, excellent films.

Best Lead Actor

Nominees: Christian Bale (American Hustle); Bruce Dern (Nebraska) Leonardo DiCaprio (The Wolf of Wall Street); Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave); Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)

Should Win: Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave)
Will Win: Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave)
Shoulda been a contender: Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis); Tony Servillo (The Great Beauty); James Gandolfini (Enough Said); Tom Hanks (Captain Phillips)

This is arguably the strongest category of the year and so the limit of 5 nominees means almost inevitable disappointments somewhere. Though Matthew McConaughey is the big favourite for his impressive turn in Dallas Buyers Club, I think and hope that we’ll see a surprise here and Chiwetel Ejiofor will take home the prize. He plays the role of freeman turned slave Solomon Northup with an amazing depth and passion that never strays into overacting, holding together a powerful film.
Despite the strong competition it’s a surprise not to see Tom Hanks on the list for the title role in Captain Phillips. It’s quite possibly, with the exception of his voice work as Woody in the Toy Story films, his best performance to date and it seemed inevitable that an Academy favourite such as Hanks would have bagged a nomination but alas not. It would also have been great to see the late James Gandolfini get some recognition for the delightful Enough Said and it would have been fully deserved but perhaps the Academy feared that a posthumous nomination would’ve been regarded as a tokenism.

Best Lead Actress

Amy Adams (American Hustle); Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine); Sandra Bullock (Gravity); Judi Dench (Philomena); Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)

Should win: Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
Will Win: Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
Shoulda Been a Contender: Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Enough Said); Amy Acker (Much Ado About Nothing)

Cate Blanchett should and will win this. She’s been gifted with a magnificent part to play, full of juicy lines and opportunity to let loose, but she really does get everything out of the script and owns Blue Jasmine completely. Amy Adams is always great but she’s been better in better films than American Hustle. I’ve not seen Philomena or August: Osage County so can’t comment on Judi Dench’s or Meryl Streep’s nominations, though certainly the latter’s presence smacks of laziness on the Academy’s part.
I’d like to have seen Julia Louis-Dreyfus recognised for being completely brilliant with James Gandolfini in Enough Said but it obviously wasn’t Oscar-bait-y enough. Another of my favourite performances of the year was Amy Acker as Beatrice in Joss Whedon’s Much Ado About Nothing. Along with Alexis Denisof she leads a refreshing performance of Shakespeare’s best comedy and helped make it the funniest film of 2013.

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Best Supporting Actor

Nominees: Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips); Bradley Cooper (American Hustle); Michael Fassbender (12 Years a Slave); Jonah Hill (The Wolf of Wall Street); Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)

Should Win: Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips) / Michael Fassbender (12 Years a Slave)
Will Win: Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)
Shoulda Been a Contender: John Arcilla (Metro Manila)

Newcomer Barkhad Abdi manages to turn a film titled Captain Phillips, in which that title character is played by Tom Hanks, into one that is at least as much about his character as it is the captain. That takes one hell of a supporting performance. In 12 Years a Slave Michael Fassbender’s slave owner Edwin Epps is a horrendous but always human, always distubingly real villain. Fassbender’s believability in this role is crucial to the success of 12 Years a Slave and could so easily gone wrong in the hands of a less gifted actor. The favourite to take the Oscar is Jared Leto for Dallas Buyers Club in which he plays transgender HIV patient Rayon. His performance is commendable but it does seem that Hollywood are, to some extent at least, rewarding the role more than the acting.
One particular supporting performance that stood out to me over the past year was John Arcilla in the crime drama Metro Manila. This excellent, claustrophobic thriller follows a young family moving from a farming village in the Phillipines into the intimidating metropolis of Manila where they struggle for work and survival. Arcilla plays a co-worker of the lead character and puts in a boisterous, energetic and menacing turn that leaves you wishing for his character to return whenever he’s off screen.

Best Supporting Actress

Nominees: Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine); Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle); Lupita N’Yongo (12 Years a Slave); Julia Roberts (August: Osage County); June Squibb (Nebraska)

Should Win: Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave) / Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine)
Will Win: Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave)
Should’ve Been a Contender: Amy Adams (Her)

This is a strong category this year and any other time I’d love to see June Squibb win for her very funny performance in Nebraska. But the top two, that I can’t separate, are Sally Hawkins and Lupita N’Yongo. The latter is breathtaking as Patsey in 12 Years a Slave, controlling a role that could easily have been lost among a host of powerful performances. The scenes she shares with fellow supporting role nominee Michael Fassbender are mesmeric and haunting and I think the Academy will rightly choose her over the bookies favourite Jennifer Lawrence. But while Patsey is a serious, powerful role, I think Sally Hawkins is just as good in Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine. Cate Blanchett has taken all the plaudits for the title role but Hawkins as Jasmine’s sister Ginger is crucial to the film succeeding as much as it does and the scenes that the two share are electric.
Though I’m not sure Amy Adams’ performance in American Hustle warranted a nomination, she certainly ought to have got one for Her. I didn’t get on with the film as a whole but she is excellent in it, stealing every scene.

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Best Adapted Screenplay

Nominees: Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy & Ethan Hawke (Before Midnight); Billy Ray (Captain Phillips); Steve Coogan & Jeff Pope (Philomena); John Ridley (12 Years a Slave); Terrence Winter (The Wolf of Wall Street)

Should Win: John Ridley (12 Years a Slave)
Will Win: John Ridley (12 Years a Slave)
Shoulda Been a Contender: Jon S. Baird (Filth)

John Ridley is the big favourite here and rightly so. The 12 Years a Slave script is masterful, adapting the memoir of Solomon Northup and forming a deeply personal story that also has room for three or four other fascinating characters. In tackling the subject of slavery the dialogue is crucially unflinching, giving the cast a perfect platform on which to build nuanced, intense performances. Another key strength of the 12 Years a Slave script is in its balancing of emotions in that it’s powerful and moving but never feels artificial or manipulative in that way. A great achievement in film writing that will hopefully see John Ridley duly rewarded.
An adaptation that I thought was absolutely up there with the best of the past year was Filth. Bringing to the big screen the Irvine Welsh novel of the same title it managed to keep his inimitable, unique style without straying too close to Trainspotting, the iconic adaptation of Welsh’s work. The script is very funny, very weird and very crude, helping to make an underrated and entertaining film and also giving James McAvoy the character that produces the best performance of his career so far.

Best Original Screenplay

Nominees: David O. Russell & Eric Warren Singer (American Hustle); Woody Allen (Blue Jasmine); Craig Borten & Melisa Wallack (Dallas Buyers Club); Spike Jonze (Her); Bob Nelson (Nebraska)

Should Win: Woody Allen (Blue Jasmine)
Will Win: David O. Russell & Eric Warren Singer (American Hustle)
Shoulda Been a Contender: Umberto Contarello & Paolo Sorrentino (The Great Beauty); Joel Coen & Ethan Coen (Inside Llewyn Davis)

The frontrunners for this Oscar are two scripts that I didn’t feel worked particularly well. Spike Jonze’s Her isn’t badly written but it doesn’t really explore its excellent concept in any interesting way and American Hustle is sometimes fun but completely forgettable and overwritten. Of the other nominees Woody Allen’s script is the best and his best for a long time. It’s funny, full of well realised characters and backs the excellent cast all the way with consistently good dialogue exchanges. On top of that, it’s a moving character study that incorporates the current economic situation in America to good effect.
My own choice for best original screenplay would have gone to either The Great Beauty or Inside Llewyn DavisThe former may be a visual masterpiece but its script is very strong, full of rich monologues, sharp satire and philosophical musings that do well not to take themselves too seriously. The latter is a typically excellent piece of work from the Coen brothers, full of their trademark oddball dark humour but also a bleakness that suits the film. It’s rich in detail and hidden meanings that warrant multiple viewings, putting it alongside the best of the brothers’ oeuvre.


Top Ten of 2013

10. Filth

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In adapting Irvine Welsh’s book of the same name, Filth had an immediate struggle on its hands to avoid inevitable comparisons with Danny Boyle’s Trainspotting (also an Irvine Welsh adaptation), a film that has only grown in esteem in the 13 years since its release. But this is a different, more fantastical though not much less grim and grimy film that has at its centre a fantastic performance from James McAvoy as junkie policeman Bruce Robertson, struggling to hold it together at Christmas. McAvoy is at once unnerving and engaging, pulling off the very difficult act of performing a completely despicable lead character without losing the audience. Jon S. Baird has plenty of fun with the direction and delivers numerous startling scenes full of dark imagination. A film fully befitting its title, Filth is nasty but a whole lot of fun.

9. Enough Said

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An air of tragedy surrounded the release of Enough Said after the death earlier in the year of James Gandolfini. In his penultimate feature film role (his final one being an appearance in the upcoming Animal Rescue) he shares the lead with Julia Louis-Dreyfus in a romantic comedy that refuses to acquiesce to the tired tropes that often sap the genre of its appeal. This is a funny, convincing and moving film that thrives on its outstanding two lead performances as it follows the early relationship between divorcees Albert and Eva who, after meeting at a party, begin dating. We see their relationship grow and the various important figures in each others lives come to play their parts as the pressures, irritations and minutiae of life are explored by two brilliantly real characters.

8. Captain Phillips

Tom Hanks stars in Columbia Pictures' "Captain Phillips."

Paul Greengrass is at his best here, directing this thriller that sees Tom Hanks play the titular hero facing a crew of Somali pirates taking over his ship. Aside from an opening few minutes of needless setup that ought to have been cut, Captain Phillips is a gripping thriller that offers everything you could want from a slice of Hollywood escapist storytelling. Tom Hanks’s inherent Tom Hanks-ness only aids his role as Captain Phillips, thus justifying a wholly unimaginative piece of casting. But where risks were taken in that department they fully pay off. Somali-American actor Barkhad Abdi makes his debut as Muse, ostensibly the leader of the Somali pirates, and gives an incredibly accomplished and nuanced performance, defying his inexperience. He is ably supported by fellow new actors Barkhad Abdirahman, Faysal Ahmed and Mahat M. Ali who make up a crew of characters that could well have become criminally one-dimensional with less adept acting and directing. Providing that one can stomach the truth that the real life event the film is based on seems to be a fair way away from the tale of Hanks heroism depicted here, Captain Phillips is a great, tense thriller very well made indeed.

7. Metro Manila

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The Philippine capital city serves as a rich, manic backdrop to this engaging crime drama from English writer/director Sean Ellis. It follows a poor farming couple, Oscar and Mai Ramirez (Jake Macapagal and Althea Vega) who leave their village with their two kids in search of prosperity in their country’s capital Manila. The intense, crowded city is overwhelming and the parents struggle, making do with what work they can find to support their children. When Oscar strikes lucky with a job in security, things are looking up financially until the reality of the dangers of his job and the ambiguous intentions of his partner Ong (the outstanding John Arcilla) become more and more evident. Metro Manila is a crime thriller whose well developed characters make it something really memorable. It also boasts a tight, unpredictable story and impressive action directing from Ellis and, when combined with the characters whose fates you’re truly invested in, you get something of a gem.

6. Much Ado About Nothing

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Following the incredible success of his Avengers film, Joss Whedon’s stock couldn’t be much higher. His follow-up was this black and white adaptation of the Shakespeare comedy, shot at his own house in between principle photography and post-production of The Avengers. A pure passion project, this film makes a delightful mix of Whedon’s directing style, a handful of young, not-particularly-seasoned-in-performing-Shakespeare actors and the genius of the best of the bard’s comedies. This adaptation leaves Shakespeare’s dialogue intact and manages to create a freshness and modern comic style that makes it genuinely laugh-out-loud funny. Brilliantly performed and made with a palpable love for the play, Whedon’s Much Ado About Nothing doesn’t need to be compared with other Shakespeare adaptations, all you need to know is that this was 2013’s funniest and most interesting comedy film.

5. Blue Jasmine

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While the past few years have seen various Woody Allen efforts hailed as returns to form, Blue Jasmine is the first that genuinely stands up to his best work. Cate Blanchett stars as Jasmine, a socialite whose life has been hit by the economic crash. She travels from New York to San Francisco looking to hold her life together, staying at the home of her sister Ginger (Sally Hawkins). Woody Allen creates a brilliant study of a tragic character and her impact on her sister’s life as her own comes apart. Blanchett is outstanding as Jasmine, an actor’s dream character. She will rightfully take many plaudits and the film is hers but Sally Hawkins’ Ginger is as good a supporting performance as any in 2013 and really adds a crucial connection to the audience that could have gone missing if we were only focussing on Jasmine. Some may have doubted Allen’s ability to hit the heights again but after some wayward Europe-based pictures that felt off, the San Francisco setting dovetails with a cracking script to make Blue Jasmine a superlative drama.

4. Behind the Candelabra

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In this hugely entertaining biopic, Michael Douglas brings Liberace to life with all the lavishness, vulgarity of taste and spectacular grotesque one would expect, ably leading a wonderfully cast film. Depicting the relationship of Liberace and lover Scott Thorson (Matt Damon) from beginning to end, Behind the Candelabra adapts Thorson’s own memoir into a two-hour feast of entertainment from director Steven Soderbergh. Made for and broadcast on HBO in America, its theatrical release here meant it will act as Soderbergh’s apparent cinematic swansong following his retirement from filmmaking. If it does indeed prove to be his final film for cinema then it certainly ends his career on a high. The pure devotion to making a fun couple of hours of entertainment is what stands out as Behind the Candelabra‘s greatest strength, eschewing any view to scrabbling for a mawkish emotional note or a deeper meaning and instead reveling in its own lavish madness. The two performances of Matt Damon and Michael Douglas compliment each other extremely well, Douglas owning every scene, creating a captivating character that is completely over the top and vile and wondrous but never overacted. His Liberace is a gay Gatsby figure of bad taste and extravagance with a nastiness that Michael Douglas revels in. As Scott Thorson, Matt Damon puts in what is unquestionably his best performance since The Talented Mr Ripley and quite possibly his best ever, clearly enjoying taking this character from his humble life as an animal handler on TV sets to immersion in Liberace’s world of drugs, plastic surgery and wild excess. His is the quasi Dorothy role, crashing into a depraved Oz and losing himself there, and the audience can fully enjoy everything that transpires thanks to the film’s pleasing detachedness. With HBO’s added polish, Behind the Candelabra is ultimately impossible to really fault and if you’re after a fun, funny, imaginative film then this is just the ticket.

3. Django Unchained

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In January Quentin Tarantino returned to cinemas with his trademark bombast, crackling dialogue and detached mayhem. Django Unchained is his take on the western, seeing a slave by the name of Django (Jamie Foxx) freed by a bounty hunter Dr King Schultz (Christophe Waltz) and embarking on an odyssey across the South, seeking revenge. The result is an astonishing film that manages to make for the very best in revenge fantasy escapism while being brutal and serious in tackling the slavery of America’s past. In that respect it is as effective as any po-faced drama on the subject. Samuel L Jackson makes his customary appearance in a Tarantino flick but his character Stephen, loyal house slave of the film’s antagonist Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio), is a jaw-dropping creation: provocative, powerful and unquestionably entertaining. The film in fact boasts a number of great performances with Tarantino finding a cast that are the best collectively at delivering his lines as any since Reservoir Dogs. DiCaprio goes into all-out bonkers villain mode as Calvin Candie and Kerry Washington is great, and not in nearly enough scenes, as Django’s wife Broomhilda. But Christophe Waltz, who took home his second Tarantino-aided Oscar in February, is such a perfect match for the script it is a joy to watch his every scene. For a full review of the film go here but suffice it to say that this hugely indulgent effort from Quentin Tarantino was one of the great joys to be had at the cinema in 2013.

2. Gravity

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Though it hasn’t quite topped this list, Alfonso Cuaron’s Gravity stands out way above anything else from 2013 in terms of pure cinema. Built around the simplest of stories of astronauts lost in orbit, trying to get home, Gravity is a stunning spectacle that feels like a truly revolutionary step in filmmaking. The 3D technology that is justifiably much-maligned in modern cinema becomes essential as Cuaron creates the true wonder of space. The camerawork is astonishing and the decision to make this a thriller set in space rather than a science fiction film adds to the purity of the picture. The result is a beautiful but also very tense film that is jaw-dropping from start to finish. Criticism has been levelled at the script but what dialogue there is is fine; there are a couple of lines that’ll make you wince but it serves the film well enough. As the lead character Dr Ryan Stone, Sandra Bullock is excellent, always convincing in what must have been a difficult role to perform. But Alfonso Cuaron deserves all the acclaim for this film, his vision is realised in awesome fashion and he has produced something here that all the pioneers of cinema would have recognised as the future of the medium they helped to birth. In years and decades to come Gravity will be admired and studied as an incredible example of the unique qualities of cinema in comparison with other art forms.

1. The Act of Killing

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The experience of watching this film is unlike any other. A documentary looking at the relatively little talked about genocide in Indonesia in the 1960s, the film seeks out some of the gangster perpetrators of the killings. But where a conventional documentary maker may have simply interviewed these people and challenged them (quite probably producing a compelling film) what director Joshua Oppenheimer does here is to collaborate with these men in reenacting their torture and murders in their own way. What follows is a powerful, bizarre and very nearly unbearable stream of scenes. The film’s central subject is Anwar Congo. Now a grandfather figure, revered for being one of the leaders of the militia groups and having killed numerous people, he nonchalantly shows us various spots around his town at which he carried out his atrocities. Having headed up a group of gangsters that ran local cinemas, in one scene he explains that he and his friends would come out having seen the latest Elvis movie, cross the street and in a ‘happy mood’ would then garotte a group of victims in an adjacent building. An unsettling, uncanny character, Congo claims to have modeled himself on mobsters and thugs of Hollywood cinema and is thus keen on the element of the documentary that sets it apart from others and makes it one of the most memorable ever filmed. The gangsters are invited to reenact their atrocities in amateur films of their own design, complete with gaudy costumes, cross-dressing, gallons of fake blood and prop body parts. These scenes are as jaw-dropping a spectacle in their own way as anything in Gravity or indeed any other film. The exaggerated reality in these reenactments add to the ability of this documentary to explore the question of humanity and the depravity to which it can and has plunged to over the course of history. We see the perpetrators playing the parts of their victims, something that in a few instances proves enough to elicit an emotional response not forthcoming in simple interviews. It’s almost difficult to even recommend The Act of Killing such is its horror but it must also be said how genuinely thrilling a film this is too. There are moments when you’ll wonder whether it’s quite OK that you’re being entertained by a documentary on such a serious subject but those are thoughts that soon disappear as another extraordinary moment passes, carrying you through the two hours that seem to pass in no time at all. In short, the finest film of 2013 is one of the finest documentaries that has or will indeed ever be made. Essential viewing.

Honorable mentions: Iron Man 3, Monsters University, The Class of 92, The Conjuring, Blackfish, Wreck-It Ralph, The Place Beyond the Pines


Review – The World’s End

The World’s End
Dir. Edgar Wright
Starring: Simon Pegg, Nick Frost
Release Date: 19th July 2013
Run time: 109 mins

From the glorious two series of Spaced to Shaun of the Dead and then Hot Fuzz, the collaborations between Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost have long been a real treat for comedy fans. Their latest film, The World’s End, marks the end of a very loosely-tied thematic trilogy (dubbed The Cornetto Trilogy or The Blood and Ice Cream trilogy) and is to the robot invasion genre what Shaun of the Dead was to the zombie flick and Hot Fuzz was to the buddy cop film. The plot revolves around man child Gary King (Pegg) as he rounds up a group of five of his mates from childhood to reattempt ‘The Golden Mile’, a pub crawl in their hometown of Newton Haven. As the group embark on their mission it becomes clear that all is not as it seems in the town and they become aware of a sinister robotic presence among its inhabitants. Unfortunately, it’s not just the plot of The World’s End that isn’t quite what it appears to be, resulting in something interesting but not resoundingly successful.

It would be remiss to suggest that this film is a drastic departure from the previous films in the trilogy; it’s a British, comic take on a Hollywood genre film with Simon Pegg starring, Nick Frost supporting, complete with enjoyable turns from the British acting world and nods to Shaun and Hot Fuzz themselves. It does, in places, however take a more serious tone than those films, looking at the tragedy of Gary King as a man regressing to childish behaviours because of a disenfranchisement with his current life. We are also shown the tragedy in the character of his companion Andrew Knightley (Frost) and this casts a melancholic shadow over the film.

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In changing up the respective roles of Pegg and Frost, The World’s End freshens the Cornetto trilogy formula admirably but the problem comes in Pegg leading the film as a character that is entirely unpleasant. His performance is great but ultimately feels like it’d have better suited a supporting character as there’s nothing there to get behind as an audience. Conversely, Nick Frost’s role is the most sympathetic in the film along with perhaps Eddie Marsan’s Peter, but they don’t bear enough of the story to balance the unlikeable nature of Gary King. On the whole, the supporting cast are impressive. Alongside Pegg and Frost are three of the most reliable British actors at the moment in Eddie Marsan, Martin Freeman and Paddy Considine. Rosamund Pike also joins in the fun with a few great scenes but her performance is as brief as it is enjoyable. Any other cast details would really be spoilers but suffice to say that Edgar Wright has plenty of fun with the casting of the minor roles.

With Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg writing it’d be fair to expect The World’s End‘s strong suit to be in delivering laughs. Strangely though, this is not quite the case. That’s not to say that the screenplay is a poor one; it packs some great jokes and the aforementioned tragic character elements are an interesting feature. There are a few misses though and in a film that’s actively marketed in relation to Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz it’s difficult not to find it inferior. Ultimately, The World’s End is funny but not uproariously so and the comedy highlights are often more slapstick based and perhaps less creative than Pegg and Wright’s previous work. The basic story is great fun nailing the genre and an ending that’s unexpected in tone may be divisive but it’s well executed and avoids predictability.

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Surprisingly, The World’s End‘s solid script is outdone by Edgar Wright’s supreme direction and a great editing job by Paul Machliss, a previous collaborator with Wright on Spaced and Scott Pilgrim vs The World. The two work brilliantly together. Action sequences are as fun as anything Hollywood has produced recently and while it could be argued that the highly polished style doesn’t quite fit with the previous Cornetto films, it’s nevertheless an aesthetically pleasing film. Wright has emerged as one of the top action directors in the business and his great sequences are cut very well, fast but not too fast and, in the remarkable style that we first saw in Spaced, the editing somehow manages to be funny. This bathetic action style cutting of mundane acts is something of an Edgar Wright trademark and its use here is as enjoyable as ever. His directorial style manages to avoid stagnation while being immediately recognisable and it won’t be a surprise to see his star continue to rise to the very top in Hollywood.

As the final part of Wright Pegg and Frost’s trilogy, The World’s End is unfortunately a clear weak link. But if taken on its own merits (something that the film and its marketing, and indeed this review, did not try to encourage at all) then you find a funny, interesting comedy film whose directing stands out as a prime reason for recommendation.

Verdict: starstarstarhalfstaremptystar 3.5/5


Review – Iron Man 3

Iron Man 3
Dir. Shane Black
Starring: Robert Downey Jr, Ben Kingsley, Guy Pearce
Release Date: 25th April 2013
Run time: 130 mins

After the stunning success, both critically and financially, of Joss Whedon’s Avengers film, the monster that is Marvel’s superhero movie franchise powers on with Iron Man 3. Following a disappointingly forgettable second outing, previous Iron Man director Jon Favreau relinquishes that role with Shane Black taking the helm. This is Black’s first film since his criminally underseen and underrated directorial debut Kiss Kiss Bang Bang in 2004 and one imagines that re-teaming with Robert Downey Jr was the deal breaker in getting him back into the Hollywood fold. Ultimately the fresh approach from Shane Black is exactly what the Iron Man films needed. At some point there will be a inevitable drop in demand for and quality of these Marvel superhero films but it certainly isn’t going to start yet. Iron Man 3 delivers a sharp, clever and riotously fun action romp that reminds us why Tony Stark is now Robert Downey Jr’s career defining role.

IRON MAN 3

Kicking off with a flashback to 1999, Iron Man 3 establishes its basic premise quickly and efficiently. An enigmatic, grandiose terrorist that calls himself the Mandarin (Ben Kingsley) is carrying out attacks on US soil and successfully interrupting nationwide TV broadcasts with his own menacing videos. Aside this central plot line we are also introduced to Aldrich Killian (Guy Pearce). First meeting Tony Stark in 1999, Killian is a scientist looking for an audience with Tony. After being utterly ignored during this first encounter he returns to Stark Industries in the present day to present his scientific discovery to Pepper Potts (now head of Stark Industries) hoping to get a more positive reception. He and fellow scientist Maya Hansen (Rebecca Hall) have developed a biological healing and controlling process they’re calling Extremis. Their company AIM is hoping to link up with Stark Industries to market Extremis with no regard to its possible use as a weapon. After being rejected by Pepper, Killian’s technology inevitably ends up in the hands of the Mandarin and from that set-up Iron Man 3 runs.

While that story structure may not immediately seem to set Iron Man 3 apart from its counterparts in the genre, the real delights in this film are in the twists and turns of Shane Black’s script. The plot is remarkably clever and with the Mandarin the film has one of the best used and crafted villains of any of the recent flood of superhero films. The casting of Ben Kingsley is spot on and Guy Pearce also handles a tricky character very well. Franchise regulars Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle and Jon Favreau return in their respective roles as Pepper Potts, Col James Rhodes and head of security Happy Hogan, giving solid performances, Favreau in particular is given some great early scenes in which to demonstrate his knack for comic acting. Their is also a small but crackingly well written role for 11 year-old actor Ty Simpkins. He gives a great performance as a kid fulfilling the dream of being stand-in sidekick for Iron Man, exchanging some snappy dialogue with the man himself. Character-wise the only flaw is with Rebecca Hall’s character. As the chief scientist behind Extremis her role is disappointingly underwritten and perhaps left on the cutting room floor. In the end a talented actress is left to inhabit a forgettable role, something that should really have been avoided in post-production.

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As strong as the supporting cast are, they are all (rightly) subordinate to Robert Downey Jr in the title role. It’s the role of a lifetime for him and across all three Iron Man films as well as The Avengers he owns the character in the way that no other actor has quite managed in other superhero roles. The charm of the performance is often in his gift for comedy and Shane Black’s script offers plenty to have fun with, but when the script calls for a snap back to a serious tone Downey Jr does so convincingly to keep the heart in the film.

Bringing in Shane Black to write and direct is the inventive executive decision that was key to getting the spark back into the the series that the second film lost. His script brings a joyful irreverence to the whole thing as well as being solidly funny throughout and never not hugely entertaining. And in a year that will bring numerous other superhero flicks it’s important that there are a couple of action sequences here that are supremely well directed, ensuring that Iron Man 3 will be rewatched and remembered beyond the near future. Of particular note is the clever use of the multiple Iron Man suits in numerous sequences. It’s accomplished blockbuster directing coming from a man that hasn’t directed a feature in 9 years. Admirable to say the least.

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Being the first part in Marvel’s so dubbed ‘Phase 2′ set of films leading up to The Avengers 2, Iron Man 3 does surprisingly well in making sure it tells its own story rather than feeling like a warm-up to a bigger attraction. There are a few too many references to events from The Avengers though and they are slightly irritating when you’re distracted from the engaging central plot by a note about something from a previous film. Thankfully we are spared any longer scenes that try to set up future films, something that is difficult to pull-off, and though the 2 hour plus running time is indulgent, the film doesn’t outstay its welcome.

If you’re looking for an action film that delivers fun, well-directed blockbuster scenes alongside some snappy dialogue and an intelligent plot, look no further than Iron Man 3. Robert Downey Jr carries the film with ease and the return of Shane Black to directing is thoroughly welcome. Some small problems stop the film reaching the heights of the genre’s very best efforts in The Avengers or The Dark Knight, but Iron Man 3 certainly puts a claim in to be the best of the rest. Getting in while the superhero film is making hay, Iron Man 3 is such fun that Marvel’s comic book juggernauts are looking unstoppable.

Verdict: starstarstarstaremptystar 4/5


Review – Wreck-It Ralph

Wreck-It Ralph
Dir. Rich Moore
Starring: John C Reilly, Sarah Silverman, Jack McBrayer
Release Date: 8th February 2013
Run time: 108 mins

Now that those who get dewy-eyed upon hearing the Green Hill Zone theme from Sonic are of an age when they might have children of their own, the latest offering from Disney Animation Studios seeks to mix its trademark movie magic with a rush of video game nostalgia in Wreck-It Ralph. The titular lead character is the baddie of a Donkey Kong-esque arcade game called Fix-It Felix Jr. He climbs a high rise block of flats, destroys it and the player controls Fix-It Felix, rectifying the damage and denying Ralph. He plays out his role as villain, every time being quashed and humiliated by the hero Felix and is becoming sick of not being appreciated as his counterpart is. Things come to a head at a party for the game’s anniversary to which Ralph has not been invited and in a rage at never being allowed to play the hero, Ralph ‘game-jumps’ in search of a hero’s medal to call his own. After traversing the world of futuristic shooter Hero’s Duty, Ralph ends up in Sugar Rush, a kart racing game in which he meets Vanellope Von Schweetz, a neglected so-called glitch in Sugar Rush. Striking a deal, Vanellope and Ralph team up to try to win Vanellope a race and Ralph a medal.

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From the opening scene the animation in Wreck-It Ralph works as an immediate hook. Stylistically it is absolutely spot on, from the nods to the 8-bit video game animations of yesteryear to the incandescent landscape of the candy land in Sugar Rush. We’re currently in a real golden age for animation and Wreck-It Ralph takes the medium to yet another level. And beyond the technical achievements it also has a well defined art style across the whole film as well as in the individual and diverse settings within. The world of arcade shooter Hero’s Duty riffs heavily on that of James Cameron’s Aliens and other sci-fi classics, while the little details within the animation of individual characters are a treat, helping to create a strong cast.

Disney have regularly pushed the technical boundaries of animated cinema but their productions haven’t always been so successful from a storytelling point of view. Pixar set the benchmark with a string of excellent films but Disney Animation Studios are finally beginning to show that they can reach similar heights. Wreck-It Ralph ultimately doesn’t quite hit every mark story-wise but a well plotted ending and some great, witty lines make it one of the better animated films of the last year. The main plot that sees Ralph trying to win himself a hero’s medal is fine but nothing especially innovative. It suffices to carry the first half of the film as we are introduced to the world of the arcade and the nods to video games come thick and fast. The Hero’s Duty portion of the story is probably the weakest element to Wreck-It Ralph. It’s never quite as engaging as the rest and feels like a strange attempt to comment on the modern trend of video games but is ultimately vague and underwritten. Thankfully though, once the action moves to Sugar Rush the story hits its stride and is well thought out thereon in.

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Supporting the solid script Wreck-It Ralph showcases on of the finest ensemble voice acting cast in years. The performances are all absolutely spot on, filling the characters with life and getting every inch from the script from its comedy to its emotional core. John C Reilly is reliably excellent in the lead role, creating an endearingly clumsy and lovable giant. Sarah Silverman, whose part was written with her in mind, strikes up a great partnership with Reilly’s Ralph, making Vannelope insanely adorable as well as delivering some of the film’s funniest lines. Arguably though, the film is stolen in turn by either Jack McBrayer as Fix-It Felix or Alan Tudyk as the mad King Candy. The former makes Felix hilariously earnest and naive in a tricky role that could easily have grated. Tudyk bases his performance on an impression of the legendary Ed Wynn and it is one damn fine impression. But beyond that he adds the necessary ambiguity in his motives that make King Candy truly memorable. Jane Lynch’s Calhoun, a warrior from Hero’s Duty, is the fifth and final piece of the main cast. While her character’s story elements aren’t always as engaging as others, Lynch’s performance is great and adds much needed charisma to her scenes, particularly in the great glimpse we have of her programmed back-story.

With Rich Moore at the helm, Wreck-It Ralph was bound to be a reference-heavy treat. This is the man who directed several of the greatest episodes in the golden era of The Simpsons, including the finest stand-alone episode of television ever in Cape Feare. It’s no surprise then that the nods to both video games and films are well executed, clever and often very very funny. The opening scene of Ralph at a ‘Bad Anon’ meeting of fellow video game villains is glorious and followed by a steady flow of cameos from the world of the arcade. These slowly get fewer and give way to a number of nice film references from Aliens to Batman and best of all a fantastic joke with some Oreos invoking a scene from The Wizard of Oz (as you can tell, it doesn’t translate well to text). The key to the success of these references is the strong comic writing that backs them up; there is no referencing for the sake of it. This comic touch provides some great Simpsons-esque sight gags too that should support the film through multiple viewings. Rich Moore certainly seems a director worth following and hopefully the success of this will see other greats of the TV animation world take on feature length projects.

With one or two missteps Wreck-It Ralph is not up there with the very best animated films of the last ten-fifteen years. It does however excel in many areas from the outstanding voice acting to the stunning animation. Add in the frequent hilarity and the intelligent plotting and you have a thoroughly entertaining film that is always charismatic enough to paper over any cracks and be remembered fondly without the aid of the inevitable sequel.

Verdict: starstarstarstaremptystar 4/5


Best Animated Short

Amid all the Oscar hullabaloo, every year the nominations for the short film prizes give some seldom otherwise-gained attention to a number of wonderful and inventive films. The five films nominated for the 2013 Oscars are all now available online (though typically FOX won’t make theirs available freely so somebody else has done it on their behalf) and every one is an excellent example of the best work in animation today. Head Over Heels is a claymation story of an elderly couple trying not to drift apart; Disney’s Paperman (currently screening before Wreck-It Ralph) blends computer animation with hand-drawn to tell a boy meets girl tale with a twist; Adam and Dog introduces us to the first man’s best friend; Fresh Guacamole is a glorious stop-motion film that delivers bags of invention in just 100 seconds (the shortest Oscar nominated film ever) and lastly Maggie Simpson in The Longest Daycare gives the youngest of the family her finest hour (in 5 minutes). All of the films are wordless and, as is often the case with animated shorts, seek to display the latest technical achievements in animation alongside efficient and charming storytelling. The variety between the five films is pleasing and makes tough the choosing of a winner. For me, Adam and Dog is just about the pick of the bunch. Directed by Disney animator Minkyu Lee, it tells a beautiful, inventive story with an art style that is simply stunning. As a huge Simpsons fan it will be difficult not to root for The Longest Daycare come Oscar night though, as David Silverman’s 5 minute delight includes all the wit, invention and heart that made The Simpsons the greatest television programme of all time. Regardless of which of them takes the Oscar home, this year’s line-up has got to be one of the best ever and hopefully will get the attention they deserve.

Here are the films in all their glory:

http://www.filmofilia.com/paperman-full-animated-short-film-135358/ (youtube clip no longer available)

http://www.filmofilia.com/watch-full-oscar-nominated-short-the-simpsons-the-longest-daycare-by-david-silverman-137983/


Review – Django Unchained

Django Unchained
Dir. Quentin Tarantino
Starring: Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz
, Leonardo DiCaprio
Release Date: 18th January 2013
Run time: 165 minutes

With his eighth feature film, Quentin Tarantino sets his sights on the theme of slavery in America and chooses to frame it in the archetypal American film genre, the western. Taking the name Django from a series of spaghetti westerns, Tarantino puts his mark on that sub-genre while using the wider influence that the western had on American cultural history, in conjunction with the slavery theme, to emphasise the uncomfortable fact that this is a large part of the country’s history that its mainstream cinema has largely failed to confront.

In an opening scene that bears all the hallmarks of its director, bounty hunter Dr King Schultz (Christoph Waltz) interrupts the journey of a couple of hicks who are leading a line of shackled slaves across the country in the dark. In the guise of a travelling dentist, complete with comedy giant-tooth wagon ornament, Schultz reveals that he is looking for a particular man among the slaves. Bamboozling the slave traders with his long words and false charm, Schultz finds Django and, when his offer of trade is refused, dispatches the traders with an ultraviolent flourish.

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That first scene reacquaints the audience not only with the fizz of Quentin Tarantino’s dialogue but also with the best actor he has ever found to deliver it. Having been a revelation as chief villain Col. Hans Landa in Inglourious Basterds, Waltz once again excels with a Tarantino script, bringing vital comic touch and a beautiful lyricism to a film that is often unflinching and brutal. His gift for bringing out the comedy in the script is delightful but the real brilliance in this film is in the chemistry between himself and Jamie Foxx as Django. They feed off each other and the relationship between the characters evolves beautifully. Schultz never seems patronising even as he assumes something of a teacher role to Django’s student, the pick of their scenes together being Schultz’s recounting of the Norse myth of Brünnhilde being saved by the hero Siegfried. This and a number of other memorable scenes are crucial to the film holding together. Django’s search for his wife and quest for revenge are so much more engaging thanks to the strength of the character work that goes before it, resulting in a long but consistently rewarding film.

The choice to tackle slavery as a theme in a western revenge fantasy is ambitious to say the least and with so unsubtle a director as Tarantino at the helm it could be cause for trepidation. It is a wonder that it all comes together so well. In fact, the uncompromising attitude taken by the director pays off tremendously because his use of violence is so intelligent. Just as many of the great American novelists show adept use of violence in their literature, so Tarantino does here, establishing himself as one of today’s great American directors. Django Unchained features two distinct types of depicted violence, that which is done to the slaves and that of Django’s revenge upon the slavers. The film’s approach to the violence of slavery is to show it as brutal and raw and extremely discomforting. A number of scenes are tough to watch, one in particular involving a pack of vicious dogs is possibly the most arresting scene that Quentin Tarantino has committed to screen. In contrast to those, the scenes of revenge fantasy are pure exploitation cinema. Blood packs aplenty explode all over, throwing up laughably copious amounts of red gloop. This is unashamed revelry in violent cinema as pure, cathartic entertainment and it is glorious. Elements of Quentin Tarantino’s direction can and will be debated for many years to come but his ability to produce disconnected, colourful, exciting, escapist entertainment can surely not be questioned. Of that genre he is a master. Thanks to the adept balance of style between raw brutality and over the top splattergore, Django Unchained is both an interesting, intelligent film about slavery as well as being one of the most wickedly entertaining films in many a year.

Django Unchained earns its payoff with the strength of its character work. From the duo of Django and Dr Schultz, whom you will cheer on every step of the way, to Leonardo DiCaprio’s blustering man-baby villain Calvin Candie, a perfect cartoonish monstrosity, the strong and diverse cast of characters are consistently entertaining and well acted. While Christoph Waltz’s performance would probably steal most other films, Jamie Foxx matches him scene for scene, creating a cracking protagonist. He gets every ounce of depth from the script, showing his love for his wife as he pleads with a slaver not to whip her and then later sharing an electric scene with DiCaprio’s Calvin Candie as Django holds his nerve to stare him down.

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Foxx and Waltz carry the majority of the film, as its first ninety minutes or so is essentially a buddy movie, but the rest of the cast add much once they make their late entrances. Leonardo DiCaprio is in his element under Tarantino’s direction. Unrestrained and over the top, Calvin Candie is a brilliant comic-book style villain that DiCaprio has bags of fun with. In particular his exchanges with Waltz are a treat, trading punchy dialogue that can’t fail to raise a grin. It is also refreshing to have a movie villain that doesn’t base itself on Heath Ledger’s Joker from The Dark Knight, a trend that has diluted many a blockbuster recently.

As Django’s wife Broomhilda, Kerry Washington is also very impressive. Brutally separated from her husband she endures horrors thereafter and is branded on the face with an ‘r’ for her attempts to run away. Washington’s performance is touching and adds much to the early scenes at Candieland (Calvin Candies modestly named ranch). Broomhilda serves there under the servant-elder Stephen, played by Tarantino stalwart Samuel L Jackson, and with that character Django Unchained gets very unsettling indeed. Stephen is as vile a character as one could imagine and, as if deliberately eschewing good taste, also one of the funniest. The usual raucous comic performance that you expect from Jackson is here but comes from a character that is viciously devoted to his white master, using the N-word numerous times, with venom. A shaky old man with a cane to support him, his weak physical appearance is in contrast to his authority over the black servant staff and his apparent hatred of them. In Stephen, Django Unchained has a character that demonstrates the film’s unerring portrayal of this time in American history and it is testament to both Tarantino and Samuel L Jackson that his presence is so chilling and memorable.

Coming in at over two and a half hours, Django Unchained does sometimes, inevitably, have failings coming from self-indulgence on Tarantino’s part. In particular his own cameo in the film is drastically ill-advised and, frankly, awful. He attempts an Australian accent with embarrassing results and adds nothing positive. It just leaves you wishing someone on set had taken him aside and just said ‘seriously, what are you doing?!’ By no means as bad but still a little jarring is a comic scene involving an inept group of KKK members. The scene is very funny as a comedy sketch but unfortunately doesn’t fit with the film. Some harsher editing was needed but this is nitpicking really as the film finds its mark again almost immediately. The odd blip (and they are far fewer than in Inglourious Basterds or Kill Bill) is a small price to pay for the moments that Tarantino’s over-indulgence actually pays off though. A long showdown between Candie, Django, Scultz and Stephen at the dinner table is marvellous and the soundtrack too is indulgent but great. For the first time Quentin Tarantino uses original material in a soundtrack and it works very well, with the legendary Ennio Morricone offering up an original piece that calls back his work in the classic spaghetti westerns of the sixties. These fit nicely next to a mix of other genres including Rick Ross’s rap 100 Black Coffins, also written for the film. The tracks are all edited distinctly and meticulously matched with appropriate scenes: the kind of attention to detail that pays dividends.

A clever, funny, chilling and gloriously entertaining bonanza, Django Unchained is an unmitigated success. Its depiction of slavery is rightfully uncompromising and ought to be praised for being so. As well as this, the film is sharply witty, rich with brilliant characters and graced with terrific acting throughout. The inevitable self-indulgence throws up the occasional blip but they are thoroughly overshadowed by the moments of indulgence that create excellent cinema. This is certainly Quentin Tarantino’s best work since Jackie Brown and it may well go on to leave a legacy surpassing that of anything he has done before. See Django Unchained, love Django Unchained and prepare to want to see it again and again and again.

Verdict: starstarstarstarstar 5/5


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